US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made a statement on Monday in which he accused China of “abusing human rights” and smeared China’s resolute measures to maintain national stability in the late 1980s. He also criticized China’s governance in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The US has stepped up its attacks on China on human rights issues simply because Washington’s trade war with China is proving to be invalid. Now, the US has decided to impose more pressure on China over human rights issues.

In fact, the US has no credibility to hold the moral high ground. Its accusations are nothing but empty talk from a high-pitched speaker. Pompeo’s statement will not be echoed in Chinese society. Instead, it will reaffirm the Chinese public’s belief that current US administration is hostile to China, and Chinese cannot pin hopes on it.

Chinese are convinced that the US government is trying to deprive China of its continued development. Washington is treating interests of the US and China as a zero-sum game. It is well recognized that the rights of Chinese are mostly rooted in sustained national stability and development. The destruction of China’s stability and development is the ultimate deprivation of the rights of Chinese. The current US government is becoming the top hijacker of Chinese human rights.

Chinese are no longer so naive to believe the US is a protector of Chinese human rights. The US government always threatens to move jobs in China to the US or to Southeast Asia. They celebrate every sign that could be interpreted as economic downturn in China. Is that sincere compassion for Chinese human rights?

When Washington released information regarding trade war, it didn’t care about any negative impact it may have on China’s stock market or potential losses it may cause for Chinese stock investors. The US would rather see bigger losses on China to bring the country to its knees. The trade war launched by the US put the welfare of Chinese people at risk. Meanwhile, the same group of US politicians put on another face and made accusations about China’s human rights, as if they really care about human rights of Chinese people.

Under the campaign of “America First,” Washington has utilized its policies to eliminate the opportunity for social and economic development in many countries that will lead to the improvement of human rights. China is facing perhaps the most vicious and most hypocritical US government since its reform and opening-up.

In examining cases of China’s so-called human rights violations raised by some US elites, it is obvious that those cases often relate to Chinese dissidents. The purpose is to stir up political division within China in order to split the country. In other words, they are advocating specific rights so that they can disrupt China without taking any responsibility.

It is well recognized that the US vigorously pursues its self-defined human rights philosophy for vicious political purposes. Chinese are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of not accepting human rights issues raised by the US and not accepting US values for obvious political purposes. The improvement of Chinese human rights hinges on China’s continued economic and social development. Chinese know where to go and how to go, and do not need “teachers” that have vicious intentions.

If Pompeo really cares about Chinese human rights, he can order the US State Department to lift the newly-imposed visa restrictions for Chinese students. Those students have made a lot of preparations for studying abroad, which signifies an important step in their lives. Refusing their visas tramples their individual rights. Secretary Pompeo, who has the power to set visa policies, would make great contributions to Chinese rights if he could lift those visa restrictions.

The US offers its commiserations for human rights in China, yet in actions, it has been trampling on China’s human rights. It is time for Mr Pompeo and his colleagues to stop the self-contradictory moves.

The year 2019 is special for China-US ties. On January 1, 1979, China and the US established formal diplomatic ties.

There is an old saying in China that “at 40, one should be no longer confused”. It means at 40, we can figure out many things. However, as US-China relations enter the 40th year, it seems far from being “no longer confused”. Over the past year, bilateral relations have seen crests and troughs. The trade war was like a raging fire. Voices like “decouple”, “new Cold War”, “Thucydides Trap” have become shriller. Both countries are facing a tough moment. Once again, Beijing and Washington need to determine the direction of their bilateral ties.

“Consider the past and you shall know the future” goes another saying in China. Reviewing the past helps us know the future. Looking back at the 40 years’ of China-US relationship, although bilateral ties have been choppy, there has been historic progress.

Forty years ago, the number of visits between the two states was only several thousand annually, but in 2017 it exceeded 5.3 million. Four decades ago, the bilateral trade volume stood at less than $2.5 billion. However, in 2017, it hit over $580 billion. Investment between the two nations increased from nearly zero in 1979 to over $230 billion in 2017. Over the 40 years, Beijing and Washington have cooperated bilaterally, regionally and internationally from solving regional issues to fighting terrorism, from dealing with international financial crisis to promoting global economic issues.

Over time, bilateral relations have also seen setbacks. There have been four incidents that have affected ties over decades. The first one took place between 1989 and 1991, when the US slapped sanctions on China, including the suspension of high-level contact and military communication between the two states. Afterwards, more than 20 nations followed the US to crack down on China. Hence, bilateral relations dropped to the lowest point since 1972. The crisis across the Taiwan Straits from 1995 to 1996 was the second one. In May 1995, the US government approved then Taiwan leader Lee Teng-hui’s visit to Cornell University in the US. To counter Taiwan independence forces, the Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA) launched military exercises and missile tests near Taiwan waters in July and August 1995 and March 1996. During the second exercise, Washington warships USS Independence and USS Nimitz sailed into Taiwan Straits. The third crisis was a missile attack on the Chinese embassy in Yugoslavia by US-led NATO on May 7, 1999, triggering the Chinese people’s fury. China-US aircraft collision in 2001 was the fourth one in which a US Navy EP-3 reconnaissance plane and a PLA Navy F-8 fighter collided killing Chinese pilot Wang Wei. The US plane landed at Lingshui airport on Hainan Island without China’s permission.

The four incidents had a huge impact on bilateral ties, bringing them to a tearing point. However, these crises prompted leaders of both countries to invest plenty of time and energy to address these issues by ramping up communication between the two governments and enhancing mutual understanding, restoring normalcy in ties.

Experience can offer lessons for fluctuating China-US relations.

First, both countries need to seek mutual interest. Positive China-US ties began with common geopolitical requirements. After the Cold War, both nations agreed to strengthen economic and trade cooperation as globalization dawned. Although the two countries are involved in a trade dispute, there is still room to expand economic and trade ties. There is much more to China-US ties than the trade dispute. Additionally, the two have consistently sought common interest in preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, dealing with financial crises and climate change. These have contributed to the development of relations.

Second, as ties are complicated and so are domestic realities, the heads of the two states should play a leading role in dealing with relations.

Third, the two governments are supposed to explore institutional links. China and the US are two great powers with diverse social systems, ideologies, cultures and traditions. It is normal that conflicts and problems between the two exist. The key is how to manage them, so that they do not hurt relations. Effective communication between the two governments is one way of coping with it.

Finally, social communication between the countries should be expanded.

Crises lead to erosion of Washington-Beijing ties, while tackling them not only controls them, but also enables both sides to become more familiar with each other and more aware of the intentions of both sides. With competitive relations, crises and controlling them may be a common course bilateral ties take. Therefore, we need to prepare mentally for such eventualities.

When the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) offered the public an opportunity to send their names to the Red Planet with its Mars 2020 rover, more than 5.8 million people signed up in just one week.

Using an electron beam, the Microdevices Laboratory at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California will stencil the submitted names onto a silicon chip with lines of text smaller than one-thousandth the width of a human hair (75 nanometers). At that size, more than 1 million names can be written on a single dime-sized microchip. The chip will ride on the rover under a glass cover, according to the website of NASA.

With NASA’s Mars 2020 rover entering its final test phase before the spacecraft launch, a Chinese couple has participated in the drive to send their names to Mars.

Qi Binying, who is based in Sierra Madre, Southern California, had thought it was just a joke among her friends.

When she keyed in her name in the NASA registration system and generated the boarding pass for download, she felt that outer space was right in front of her, according to a report on Chinese language daily World Journal on Saturday.

Qi’s husband, Robert, an engineer with the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has also registered his name in the system.

Robert said that he had received an official boarding commemorative card and will record approximately 504 million kilometers of flight miles, according to the report.

He also works on a research program for NASA searching for the original location of the Earth.

The rover is scheduled to launch as early as July 2020, with the spacecraft expected to touch down on Mars in February 2021.

Besides this campaign, NASA also rolled out an activity to collect names for NASA’s InSight spacecraft on Mars. More than 2.4 million people signed up, of whom 260,000 were from China.

The InSight spacecraft touched down safely on Mars on November 26, 2018 kicking off a two-year mission to explore the deep interior of the Red Planet.

Chinese scientists have found a major lithium deposit in Southwest China’s Yunnan Province, estimated to contain more than 5 million tons.

There are approximately 40 million tons of proven lithium reserves in the world, the Xinhua News Agency’s Globe magazine reported.

A team led by research fellow Wen Hanjie from the Institute of Geochemistry under the Chinese Academy of Sciences found 340,000 tons of lithium oxide in a test site in central Yunnan.

They estimated the total amount of lithium to be in excess of 5 million tons. The lithium discovered is a new type in carbonate formation, the institute said on its website on Monday.

Lithium, a chemical element mainly contained in brines, pegmatite and clay, is viewed by some analysts as one of the most valuable metals in the first half of the 21st century.

The increasing reliance of the high-tech industry on lithium makes it an essential strategic resource for industrialized countries, analysts said.

The prices of lithium carbonate increased from less than 50,000 yuan ($7,236) per ton in October 2015 to 80,000 yuan per ton by the end of 2018. The value of the global lithium market is expected to rise from $60 trillion in 2017 to $100 trillion in 2025, the Globe magazine reported.

About 80 percent of lithium used in China from 2011 to 2015 was imported, Xinhua reported. The Institute of Geochemistry said on its website that it is urgently necessary for China to find new sources of lithium, as the country has abundant carbonate clay resources.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo made an announcement on Monday in which he accused China of “abusing human rights” and smeared China’s resolute measures to maintain national stability in the late 1980s. He also criticized China’s anti-terrorism and crime fighting measures in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. The US has stepped up its attacks on China on human rights issues simply because Washington’s trade war with China is proving to be invalid. Now, the US has decided to impose more pressure on China over human rights issues.

In fact, the US has no credibility to hold the moral high ground. Its accusations are nothing but empty talk from a high-pitched speaker. Pompeo’s statements will not be echoed in Chinese society. Instead, they will reaffirm the Chinese public’s belief that the Trump administration is hostile to China, and a friendly US government to China is probably just pie in the sky.

Chinese are convinced that the US government is trying to deprive China of its continued development and gains for its own benefit. In their opinion, it is supposed to be a zero-sum relationship between the two nations. It is well recognized that the rights of Chinese are mostly rooted in sustained national stability and development. The destruction of China’s stability and development is the ultimate deprivation of the rights of Chinese. The current US government is becoming the top hijacker of Chinese human rights.

Chinese are no longer so naive as to regard the US as a haven, or an impetus, for Chinese human rights. It’s not 30 years ago. The Trump administration always threatens to “replace the labor force in China with that in the US,” or in Southeast Asia. They celebrate every sign that could be interpreted as economic downturn in China. Is that sincere compassion for Chinese human rights?

When Washington announced the start of the trade war, it didn’t care about any negative impact a trade war may have on China’s stockmarket or potential losses it may cause for Chinese shareholders. The US would rather see bigger losses on China to bring the country to its knees. The trade war launched by the US put the welfare of Chinese people at risk. Meanwhile, the same group of US politicians put on another face and made accusations about China’s human rights, as if they really care about individual rights of Chinese people.

Under the campaign of “America First,” the Trump administration has utilized its policies to eliminate the opportunity for social and economic development in many countries that will lead to the improvement of human rights. China is facing perhaps the most vicious and most hypocritical US government since its reform and opening-up.

In examining cases of China’s so-called human rights violations raised by some US politicians, it is obvious that those cases often relate to Chinese dissidents. The purpose is to stir up political division within China in order to split the country. In other words, they are advocating specific rights so that they can disrupt China without taking any responsibility.

It is well recognized that the US vigorously pursues its self-defined human rights philosophy for vicious political purposes. Chinese are becoming increasingly aware of the importance of not accepting human rights issues raised by the US and not accepting US values for obvious political purposes. The improvement of Chinese human rights hinges on China’s continued economic and social development. Chinese know where to go and how to go, and do not need “teachers” that have vicious intentions.

Mr Pompeo, if you really care about Chinese human rights, please order the US State Department to lift the newly-added visa restrictions for Chinese students. Those students have made a lot of preparations for studying abroad, which signifies an important step in their lives. Refusing their visas tramples their individual rights. Secretary Pompeo, who has the power to set visa policies, would make great contributions to Chinese rights if he could lift those visa restrictions.

In other words, the US offers its commiserations for so-called human rights violations in China, yet in actions, it has been trampling on China’s human rights for years. It is time for Mr Pompeo and his colleagues to stop the self-contradictory moves.

The Anglo-Nepalese War (1814-16), which Nepal lost, resulted in large-scale land cessions in the south of Nepal to the British.

It was after occupying India that the UK gradually expanded its ambitions to Nepal, the mountainous kingdom in the Himalayas. The UK’s greater strategic goal was to pave a way to China’s Tibet and thus to grab the land ahead of Russia.

But the British army suffered strong resistance when invading Tibet. Thanks to support from the central government of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), the geographical barrier formed by the Himalayas – “the roof of the world,” – and the decline of the UK’s national power, the British failed in the end to occupy Tibet.

The UK was gradually surpassed by the US after World War I ended in 1918. Soon after, the Nepal-Britain Treaty of 1923 was signed and Nepal was recognized by the UK as an independent and sovereign nation.

Nepal’s strategic position can be clearly seen from history. Today, it is particularly important because China – Nepal’s near neighbor – has kept rising as the world’s second largest economy.

This might explain the US increased focus on Nepal in its Indo-Pacific Strategy, a US initiative to broaden and deepen strategic cooperation between countries in the Indo-Pacific region. David J Ranz, acting deputy assistant secretary for the State Department’s Bureau of South and Central Asian Affairs, said on May 14 in Kathmandu that “Nepal would benefit from the Indo-Pacific Strategy,” and that the strategy would “create an economic opportunity and ensure security to the benefit of both the United States and Nepal.”

To this day, the US has not described its Indo-Pacific Strategy as an initiative to target or contain China, but neither has the US stated specific plans to drive economic growth in this region, making the strategy seem unrealistic. The only outcome the strategy has achieved might be letting the US accelerate military cooperation with relevant countries.

Is this what Nepal wants? The US is aware of the urgent needs of Nepal, a country adjacent to two major powers – China and India. But the US will never base its strategy on Nepal’s needs.

In consideration of its geopolitical role, Nepal does require a relative balance between the great powers, the most favorable external political environment for the development of this mountain country. However, with limited strength, it is difficult for Nepal to promote such balance between major powers amid today’s rapid globalization. It can only choose what it needs most.

Nepal’s public opinion is generally positive about Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s victory in the re-election. They hope Modi’s policies can be continued. These policies, including increasing economic investment in Nepal and further improving relations with China, are all beneficial to Nepal.

Most importantly, China’s development has made it impossible for any force to make Nepal a pawn in strategic arrangements to counterbalance China’s influence.

China’s development has provided Nepal with the potential of benefit sharing. The China-proposed Belt and Road Initiative has brought the country unprecedented opportunities by linking it to its surrounding areas and the world. Nepal will no longer be closed and poor, but will be an essential hub to connect East, South and Central Asia.

Over 200 years ago, British colonists began to march into Nepal, with China’s Tibet their next target. But the era of Western expansion starting from 500 years ago is gone forever. China’s policy of creating an amicable and prosperous neighborhood will offer people of Nepal and other South Asian countries more opportunities to improve their living standards.

The US Department of Defense announced on Friday the sale of 34 surveillance drones to four countries in the South China Sea region – Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines and Vietnam.

The sale seemed to be in line with the Pentagon’s newly released Indo-Pacific Strategy Report, details of which show the US’ goal of containing China. Reuters reported on Tuesday that “the drones would afford greater intelligence gathering capabilities potentially curbing Chinese activity in the region.”

However, if we take a second look at the manufacturer of those ScanEagle drones, Boeing Co, we can discern that the US does not necessarily mean to assist those allies in the South China Sea region, where China has been defamed by accusations of “behaving like a ‘bully,'” but to make money.

Due to the deadly crashes of Boeing’s 737 Max 8 jets, the aviation giant has seen the biggest slump in its share price since the 9/11 attacks in 2001, according to Time magazine. That a US company is suffering in the international market is too inconsistent with US President Donald Trump’s “America First” policy. Amid increasing tensions between China and the US due to the trade war, the Trump administration is happy to let US firms make money, especially if it also provokes China.

In light of this, if we look back at the US’ attempts to hit DJI, China’s leading drone manufacturer, we will not view these attempts as absurd as they first seemed.

Even though Trump has taken office, his business nature doesn’t fade. He will do anything as long as the US can make a profit and not be taken advantage of, despite sacrificing anyone else’s interests.

This is why he has started trade wars around the globe and sells US drones while cracking down on drones made by Chinese companies.

The US has been selling arms to Asia-Pacific countries, to which it is paying more attention. The arms sales will bind these countries to the US, because if you buy US equipment, it comes as a whole package, including support equipment and technical services. The US will make sure its equipment cannot be used in combination with technology from other countries. As a result, the buyers of US arms will eventually face a choice – either meet any demand of the US or have no other option to update their military equipment.

In its Indo-Pacific Strategy Report, the US described China as a “Revisionist Power.” Then on Saturday during the Shangri-La Dialogue in Singapore, acting US Secretary of Defense Patrick Shanahan said the US will not ignore China’s behavior in the South China Sea. By increasing arms sales to China’s neighbors, the US intends to provoke conflicts between China and those countries and jeopardize stability in the Asia-Pacific.

The US is subduing China while simultaneously selling arms in the region and establishing a security framework aimed at China. Asia-Pacific countries should be vigilant in case the US’ moves intensify the regional situation and seriously endanger regional cooperation – what they and China need most.

Ahead of the tourist season, Chinese airlines opened more international routes between Northwest China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region and Europe and other countries and regions.

China Southern Airlines will open its first route between Xinjiang and the heart of Europe, which starts from South China’s Guangzhou, to Vienna via Urumqi every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday beginning from June 18, cutting travel time from Xinjiang to Europe from around 50 hours by train to seven hours by air, the Xinjiang Daily reported.

The company also launched a direct flight from Urumqi to Tbilisi, capital of Georgia, every Tuesday. China Southern Airlines will offer more flights between Urumqi and Russia.

Starting Saturday, routes linking Urumqi to St. Petersburg will be resumed, and flights between Urumqi to Moscow will be offered on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays.

Sichuan Airlines, in addition to opening the Urumqi-Chongqing-Sydney route, will also optimize the current non-stop flights to Sydney.

Xiamen Airlines, which focuses on island tourism and study tours, will open more routes between Xinjiang and Southeast Asian countries, the Xinjiang Daily reported.

According to a previous editorial by People’s Daily, Xinjiang, as an inland region, used to be considered an isolated place far from the ocean while Urumqi was recognized as the furthest-from-ocean inland city with more than one million people.

However, the geographical value of Xinjiang is obvious – it connects other Chinese provinces to the east and borders Central Asia and Russia to the west, not far from Europe. Xinjiang can be regarded not only as China’s frontline in opening up to the west but also the key point linking the Eurasian continent.

The number of tourists to Xinjiang exceeded 150 million in 2018, up more than 40 percent from the previous year, authorities at the People’s Congress of the region said in January, the Xinhua News Agency reported.

Wi-Fi, face recognition and dynamic switching between male and female toilets. A number of “smart toilets” with these intelligent facilities are in service in East China’s Jiangxi Province.

In Nanchang county, local authorities have recently launched 15 new or renovated smart toilets, each equipped with free Wi-Fi, infrared sensing equipment, environmental monitoring sensors and people flow statistical terminals.

One toilet is even a “tidal toilet” that could dynamically switch cubicles depending on the number of men and women using the toilet.

“Six cubicles can be added by adjusting the electronic doors between the male and female toilets based on the people flow,” said Tu Yanbin, director of the Nanchang City Administration Bureau.

Intelligent face recognition machines at the entrance of the toilets can “spit out” 80 cm of free toilet paper for people waiting for three seconds in the designated identification area.

The recognition machines are set up with time intervals, allowing faces to be recognized again in nine minutes for free toilet paper.

Short videos on Chinese social media went viral as they depicted shoppers shoving, wrestling, and fighting with all of their might, just to get the latest T-shirt from Japanese fashion company UNIQLO.

The T-shirt, priced at almost $15, along with the viral videos, had Chinese netizens calling the shoppers crazy and said they felt sorry for them.

The hashtag “UNIQLO cooperation collection T-shirt was snapped up” had over 440 million hits on Sina Weibo as of press time.

In one video, a group rushes toward a UNIQLO store. Their pace did not slow as some lost their cell phones during the sprint.

Another video depicts shoppers crawling through a gap as the door to one store slowly opened and scrambling to beat the other shoppers.

Fights and chaos escalated as shoppers made their way into stores. A few videos show people fighting over the T-shirts.

Shoppers who were able to get a shirt held on to them like trophies as they paid for them at cashier stands.

Store mannequins weren’t safe as the shirts were ripped from their plastic bodies and they were then thrown to the ground disfigured, missing arms and legs.

What makes this T-shirt so desirable is that it was designed by American graffiti artist KAWS.

Although KAWS has designed T-shirt for UNIQLO in the past, a rumor spread online that this latest release would be his last design for the Japanese company.

The National Business Daily reported that one shop owner said they weren’t sure if this was going to be the last cooperation between the two, but UNIQLO will not replenish the shirts in the short run once the first run sells out.

The online sales, which started on Monday, were sold out within seconds.
Many waited outside one shopping mall as early as 1 am Monday morning;, while others snuck inside to wait.

After online sales began, store owners seized upon demand and some charged upwards of $90 for one T-shirt.

Netizens said the shoppers should be ashamed. Some also said this was just a cheap attempt at marketing on behalf of the company.